Dispute Resolution

.CO has adopted stringent globally accepted best practices for the defense of trademark and cyber-squatting abuse, which includes the implementation of the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP).

We are committed to protecting the legal rights of both brand owners and domain investors,  and to creating a safer, friendlier online experience for corporations, organizations, entrepreneurs and people from around the world.  If a person or entity claims that your domain name registration infringes on or violates their rights, an administrative proceeding under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP) may apply to help resolve the claim. The UDRP was adopted by The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) for the quick and inexpensive resolution of domain name disputes and is a simple and fast process that trademark owners can initiate with an accredited Dispute Resolution Mediation center. 

 It is your responsibility to determine whether a domain name registration infringes on or violates someone else's legal rights. This will likely be the case, for example, if the domain name is registered for the purpose of confusing, misleading or tricking the public; trading on the goodwill of someone else's brand; and/or for any other bad faith reason.  In each of these cases, the domain name will likely be lost during a UDRP proceeding and returned to the rightful owner, resulting in the loss of your .CO domain investment. 

If you’re not sure whether a proposed domain name registration would infringe on or violate someone else’s rights, please consult with a qualified attorney.

Please choose a provider below and click on the appropriate link for more information to make a UDRP claim.  UDRP claims may not be made directly to the .CO Registry.  Instead, they are made through a third party resource to ensure impartiality.

 

UDRP POLICY:

You are required to submit to a mandatory administrative proceeding in the event that a third party (a "complainant") asserts to the applicable Provider, in compliance with the Rules of Procedure, that:

  1. your domain name is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which the complainant has rights; and
  2. you have no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and
  3. your domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In the administrative proceeding, the complainant must prove that each of these three elements are present.

A dispute process can be initiated independently based on the above requirements and policies.  Please review the ICANN website for the UDRP Policies and ICANN Rules for more information.